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Intro I want to start this off by saying I have shot a lot of 1911s but have never been in love with them. I can see why many carry and love them, but they have never filled my needs. Now in my experience there are bad and good 1911s.

Is the 1911 obsolete?

Is the 1911 obsolete?Intro I want to start this off by saying I have shot a lot of 1911s but have never been in love with them. I can see why many carry and love them, but they have never filled my needs. Now in my experience there are bad and good 1911s. The bad ones usually cost less, have fewer features, and are well-known. The good ones are usually custom and cost a bit closer to a nice European vacation. Luckily these days we have companies that offer a mid-range option that are much more affordable. Armscor/Rock Island Armory has been around for a while, its heritage can be traced back to 1905 in the Philippines. In 1985, Armscor Precision International opened its first United States office in Pahrump, Nevada. A short while later, Armscor acquired the "Rock Island Armory" brand, a M1911 manufacturer and developer. Needless to say they have been doing this for a while. They were nice enough to send me two 1911s to test and review. They sent me a TAC Ultra CS a 9mm single stack and a TAC Ultra FS HC a 9mm double stack and 250 Rounds of Armscor 124gr 9mm FMJ (No where near enough ammo for me). Pictured: Top: RIA TAC Ultra FS, Bottom: RIA TAC Ultra CS with a G-Code Bang Box Full of Armscor 124gr 9mm FMJ TAC Ultra CS Features: To start off this is a really nice size to carry. It is very similar to the grip and slide length to a Glock 19. The second thing I noticed was how smooth the action was when manipulating the slide. “Really smooth” was what anyone who I handed it to said. It is nice! Being the TAC series it has a weapon light 1913 rail which for me is a plus and I personally think all of them should have. Yes, it is a 9mm and a lot of 1911 guys are having aneurysms over it, but I think it’s awesome. It has an interesting sight set up, Red fiber optic front and two white dot adjustable rear. It was a little too much stuff for me, personally I prefer a blacked out rear sight. It has a 3.5” barrel supported by a full length guide rod. As almost all metal guns it is a little heavy at 2.25 lbs. but very manageable. It is fitted with skeletonized hammer and trigger with adjustable over travel stop, which I saw no reason to adjust. The trigger is as expected, crisp and short. It has a parkerized matte coating and G10 grip panels. It was sent with two 8 round Rock Island Armory magazines which are proprietary. TAC Ultra FS HC Features: The TAC Ultra FS is much larger than the CS. It is a double stack, 17rd, 3lb monster of a 1911. It is fantastically smooth like the CS. It sports a 5 in barrel. It comes with a similar sight set up as the CS. It also has a 1913 rail that is an awesome and dwarfs any weapon mounted light you mount to it. It has a weight that matches the size and certainly helps control any muzzle rise whether shooting factory or +P ammunition. It comes with skeletonized hammer and trigger with adjustable over travel stop, which I again saw no reason to adjust. The trigger is competition worthy. It comes with a parkerized matte coating and G10 grip panels similar but larger than the CS with a magwell that could park a Fiat. It was sent with two 17 round Rock Island Armory magazines which are also proprietary as well. Testing The way I test firearms is not out of the ordinary. First I clean and inspect them, then I shoot..a lot. I bring it home letting the carbon build up wait for the next range day. Then as expected I go shoot it some more. Simple and realistic to how others will be using the firearms. Others like to throw them on the ground, in mud, sand, and all sorts of media, but I don’t, unless it happens naturally. I like to shoot, so I shot them a lot, rain or shine. Between the 2 firearms I fired 4800 rounds. Some may see that as a lot and others as too little. I found it to be a nice median. Both performed well within the scope of performance I expect out 1911s. The CS shot very smooth and because of the weight made any felt recoil control child’s play. The only malfunctions I had with the CS were stove pipes with the final round in one of the magazines. I inspected the mag but I couldn’t find anything wrong with it. After a few more mags it never happened again so it may have been a break in or ammo situation. No malfunctions came from shooting the FS even with low velocity T1 competition ammo . A feature I really liked that not many that haven’t used many 1911s were the slide lock/release levers. They are checkered both horizontal and vertical. Giving it an awesome feel and texture. Although I liked shooting them there were a few things I disliked about both firearms. One was the fact that they both came with sharp edges on the ambi-safety. If they were mine, I would have sanded them down a bit. The safety also came slightly too stiff for my liking but after a bit of wearing it in it became more my flavor. When getting used to gripping any of the 1911s and manipulating the safeties I would get slightly pinched by the lever. It was annoying but after a while I naturally found the proper hand placement on the grip that relieved the pinching. Your mileage may vary depending on hand size. To continue on hand size, the CS will most likely work for hand sizes smaller than mine but be aware that you will probably have to manipulate the slide lock/release lever and magazine release by breaking your grip or using you support hand. For reference, I wear large gloves. The FS I wouldn’t recommend for smaller hands. It will be uncomfortably large and hard to manipulate. Something else I disliked about both the CS and FS was the coating on the slides. I found rusting around the front sight of the CS and a little on the slide of the FS. Nothing a little CLP can’t fix, but in a world with all sorts of coatings they should have used a stronger one. Both the CS and FS where very accurate and I really enjoyed shooting them. The CS was a great concealed carry companion, but lacks in capacity. Wish its capacity was higher. It did fit perfectly in my Armordillo Concealment Lux holster which made switching from Glock to 1911 easy, due to the way the holster is made. The FS was a little harder to find a holster for but most competition rigs will accommodate it. Lastly, I hated that I couldn’t try different mags in the CS due to them only working with the factory mags and any extras having to come from Rock Island / Armscor. Picture: The RIA TAC Ultra CS with a Streamlight TLR-1 and an Armordillo Concealment Lux Holster Conclusion The CS was a perfect size for carry and I enjoyed shooting it a lot. If its capacity was twice as many rounds I would consider purchasing one for carry. The FS was HUGE and I was very happy with it performance. Over all I like what Rock Island/Armscor is producing. I am impressed with how both of these 1911s performed and if they do a little more on the coating side of things I think these are winners. For someone looking to get into the 1911 game and can’t afford the overly expensive competitors and don’t want to settle for the cheaper less reliable competitors, these are great 1911s at an affordable price. TAC Ultra CS MSRP: $786 each via Armscor.com TAC Ultra FS HC MSRP: $906 each via Armscor.com Functionality: 5/5 Weight: 2/5 Durability: 5/5 Cost: 3/5 Comfort: 4/5 Overall Total: 19/25 Disclosure of Material Connection: I received the Armscor/Rock Island Armory 1911s via Spotter Up. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. by Jon Dufresne Jon Dufresne is a former US Army Ranger. He deployed multiple times with the 3rd Battalion 75th Ranger Regiment to the Middle East in a variety of capacities. He is experienced in counter terrorism tactics, reconnaissance, Airborne operations and is a certified Emergency Medical Technician. His post military experiences include executive protection and various firearms and tactics training. He is currently pursuing a degree in Business Management. You can follow him on Instagram @LittleGr33nMan This post first appeared on spotterup.com

Best Sig MCX Uppers of 2020 Ultimate Review

Best Sig MCX Uppers of 2020  Ultimate Review

The Sig Sauer MCX is a formidable, effective and widely appreciated weapon with a compact design. The modular design of the MCX gives you a chance to club it with the famous AR lower platform to switch between both these amazing rifles almost instantaneously. Here we will take a peek inside the world of Sig Sauer MCX upper receivers, and how buying one can be a smart move on your part. So keep those eyes pinned on the screen. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Sig MCX Uppers OUR TOP PICK: MCX 5.56MM NATO AR Conversion Upper BEST BUDGET OPTION: Sig Sauer MCX 300BLK Suppressed Complete Upper BEST SIG MCX RATTLER UPPER: Sig Sauer Upper Mcx Comparison Chart of the Best Sig MCX Uppers PRODUCT DETAILS Our Top Pick Our Top Pick MCX 5.56MM NATO AR Conversion Upper 5.56 MCX conversion upper with a 16 inch barrel Full length top rail, m-lok compatible handguard with QD sling points Intricate design with smartly created cuts for reduction in overall weight View Latest Price Best Budget Option "Best Budget Option" Sig Sauer MCX 300BLK "Suppressed Complete Upper" 300blk conversion upper with suppressor can for noise reduction Includes adapter for compatibility and a two stage factory trigger Pinned and welded suppressor doesn't convert your rifle to an SBR "View Latest Price" "Sig Sauer Upper" Mcx Best MCX rattler conversion kit combo for 300blk caliber Combo includes a trigger, adapter and the receiver with full length rail Compact design with a 5.5 inch barrel and handguard with QD sling point View Latest Price Can You Really Find a Quality MCX Upper That’s Affordable? Well, the question itself is quite comprehensive and the answer is equally subjective. When you are talking about a Sig Sauer MCX, ‘cheap’ is not the word you should use. However, ‘affordable’ is a relative term for every individual depending upon how much money you can spend. There’s really no trade-off between quality and price when a MCX upper is concerned. While the rifle itself is priced above $1,900 with almost every online and offline supplier. Affordability doesn’t really present itself as a question. Additionally, since all these parts are indigenously manufactured only by Sig Sauer, the company has a monopoly on the price. Although it also means that all the aftermarket uppers are OEM and feature the best quality. Sig MCX in use. ( Source ) How Do I Choose a Sig MCX Upper? Choosing an MCX upper is similar to choosing the upper receiver for an AR, or any other comparable rifle for that matter. Here are certain things you should consider when choosing a receiver. Compatibility - Adapter and Trigger If you are buying a Sig MCX Upper, it is almost obvious that you are planning on coupling it with a standard AR receiver. Before you do that, please be aware that these uppers require a special adapter and trigger upgrade to function with standard AR style lower receivers. Quality and Finish Make sure that the quality and finish of the upper receiver casing, bcg, barrel and handguard adhere to the highest standards. There are quite a few different MCX versions available on the market which feature different barrel lengths, gas systems and finish. So you can choose one that suits you the best. MCX 5.56MM NATO AR Conversion Upper Complete or Unfinished You can either buy a complete MCX upper receiver or assemble different parts for more customization. However, buying a complete receiver saves you from the hassle of scouring for individual parts. Additionally, a complete receiver offers better value for money than buying individual components(barrel ~$600, bcg ~$400 and receiver cover w/handguard ~$400 + other parts). Accessory Attachments Buying an upper receiver that supports the attachment of accessories is always a better option, basically due to the fact that such capability allows you to customize the rifle according to your specific needs. What Do I Need to Know Before Buying? These are the most common considerations shoppers should think about: Compatibility Although the receivers reviewed in this list are compatible with standard AR-15 lower receivers. It is only possible with the help of adapters and a different trigger assembly. It is important to note that MCX trigger installation is required to ensure proper operation of the upper receiver, whereas the adapter helps eliminate the use of a buffer tube on an AR after you install the upper. Legal Issues Since the MCX is a compact platform. If your rifle falls under the definition of an SBR or pistol after switching the uppers, you’ll have to abide by certain legal restrictions such as obtaining a federal tax stamp, or adding only a brace to the pistol. These laws vary from state to state, so please check with your local laws before buying. Design Differences While the MCX looks exactly like an AR-15, it features a different design. The MCX is a gas-piston operated rifle with a state of the art adjustable gas system. Additionally, the charging handle sits a bit high compared to an AR. Plus the MCX has a folding stock to help it cram into a backpack or something compact. Quick Take - The Best Sig MCX Uppers These are our recommendations for the best Sig MCX Uppers: MCX 5.56MM NATO AR Conversion Upper Sig Sauer MCX 300BLK Suppressed Complete Upper Sig Sauer Upper MCX Now that we’ve discussed all the aspects of a Sig MCX upper, it’s time to review the best options available on the market. Apparently Sig is the only manufacturer of the MCX components, the major difference among the uppers mentioned here are dimensions, attachments and intended use. Best Overall: MCX 5.56MM NATO AR Conversion Upper CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Chambered in 5.56 NATO Two stage match grade trigger with crisp break Includes all adapters and installation hardware AR conversion upper compatible with AR lowers Can also be used to convert other caliber MCX into a 5.56 NATO Cons None we could find What Recent Buyers Report The recent customer reviews focus upon the high quality and precise fit of this upper receiver. The upper is chambered in 5.56MM NATO which is a popular intermittent cartridge. The package includes all the essential hardware which justifies its price to a good extent. Why it Stands Out to Us The conversion assembly allows you to convert your AR into an MCX, without the need for switching ammunition caliber. Additionally, the upper comes with a crisp two stage match trigger which greatly enhances accuracy. The upper features an impeccable finish and complements the aesthetics of a standard AR lower receiver. Who Will Use This Most The upper is ideal for range use, hunting and tactical applications. It is ideal for people who like to experience an MCX without changing the regular 5.56 AR caliber. Additionally, the crisp match grade trigger makes the upper suitable for competitions. Bottom Line The Sig MCX 5.56MM NATO upper should be the first choice of an AR owner who wants to get the taste without spending a ton of money. The upper comes complete with all the necessary hardware to completely eliminate compatibility issues. Best for the Money: Sig Sauer MCX 300BLK Suppressed Complete Upper CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Suppressor-ready upper receiver Does not convert your rifle into an SBR Features a 16 inch long barrel for optimal accuracy Chambered in 300 blk caliber for good range and stopping power Cons Suppressor is welded and can’t be removed High price and may attract legal implications What "Recent Buyers Report" The suppressed MCX upper features an exceptional quality and finish, while being extremely easy to install. The upper comes complete with all accessories for compatibility and the included suppressor adds to its value. Users appreciate the quick installation and the value for money this upper offers. Why it Stands Out to Us It is the only MCX upper with a suppressor on our list. Inclusion of a suppressor greatly improves the value of your firearm since it is an important accessory for tactical purposes. This upper comes chambered in 300 blk and requires minimal modifications to the rifle for installation. Who Will "Use This Most" This upper kit is suitable for people who want to have a suppressor on their MCX build and don’t want to scour the market or put effort in hiring a gunsmith for installation. The suppressor has been welded to the barrel so it stays secure in all conditions and acts as a permanent muzzle device to counter legal clauses in some states. Bottom Line The MCX 300blk suppressed upper is a very tactical replacement for your compatible lower receiver. The 16 inch barrel helps with accuracy whereas the suppressor helps with noise reduction for indoor range and tactical applications. The price may concern buyers on a budget. But overall it is a good product. Best Sig MCX Rattler Upper: Sig Sauer Upper MCX CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros 5.5 inch short barrel Converts your AR into a MCX pistol Comes complete with adapters and mounting hardware Great for compact storage and CQB or similar applications Cons Limitations with mounting stock in some states Requires you to have a tax stamp and valid permission What Recent Buyers Report The upper fits perfectly on compatible lower receivers and features a perfect finish. While the price is high, it is still a very hard to find piece so buyers don’t actually consider this a deterrent. The upper is a high quality product with almost no negative reviews from users. Why it Stands Out to Us This is a pistol upper receiver that is compatible with standard AR lower receivers. Plus it comes packaged with all the necessary hardware for installation. The barrel despite being short delivers amazing accuracy and the included trigger is of the highest quality. Who Will Use This Most The upper will create a MCX pistol that will best suited for training and tactical applications. The short rifle will be ideal for CQB and can be used in a home defense situation. Additionally, the crisp two-stage match grade trigger included with the upper is quite suitable for shooting competitions. Bottom Line While most people favor regular length carbines, this upper is for people who want to have a MCX pistol without paying the full price for it. The upper has been meticulously designed and delivers exceptional accuracy over short range. The upper comes complete and with all required hardware for easy installation and removal. 4. MCX 300 AAC Blackout AR Conversion Upper CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Available in 16 inch and 9 inch variants Allows you to convert your AR-15 in an MCX Chambered in the powerful and balanced 300blk caliber Full length rail and M-Lok handguard for adding accessories Pro 5 Cons The trigger is not very crisp What Recent Buyers Report The Sig MCX conversion upper features an impeccable quality and finish. The package comes complete with respective adapters and trigger for easy installation. However, some users did mention the price factor and minor compatibility issues with the AR style lowers. Although, overall the buyers seemed satisfied with the upper. Why it Stands Out to Us This upper works as a conversion kit to suit your AR style lower receivers. Plus it includes all the required adapters and the trigger for installation. This helps you save money which would rather be spent buying a brand new rifle. This upper is a complete and ready-to-shoot package. Who Will Use This Most The upper is perfect for people who like to customize their existing AR platform to draw the experience of shooting an MCX. The long 16 inch barrel helps with short to medium range shooting. Plus the accessory compatible design allows the user to get all the tactical features up and running within moments. Bottom Line The Sig MCX AR conversion upper is a complete and ready-to-shoot package that allows you to shoot an MCX from your AR lower platform using 300 blk ammunition . The upper is easy to install and includes all the necessary adapters for the transition. Conclusion The Sig Sauer MCX is a tactical miracle developed according to the specifications of Special Forces. While buying one can be expensive, you can buy an MCX upper receiver to couple it with your standard AR-15 lower receiver. However, you must take care of the durability, compatibility, finish, performance and your desired application before choosing a suitable upper receiver. People Also Ask The Sig MCX is a sassy, effective and desirable weapon which offers unmatched tactical and handling capabilities to the user. With the latest upgrades, an MCX upper can be coupled with a standard AR lower. Making it a very viable concept for AR-15 owners. However, there are still a few common questions lingering around in the mind of every prospective buyer. Is the SIG MCX an AR 15? Looks, yes. Technically, not much. The Sig Sauer MCX is more compact, lightweight and has a different gas system than an AR. It uses a gas piston whereas an AR-15 uses a direct impingement system to cycle. While chambered in the same caliber, the MCX is great for CQB, whereas an AR can be used for long distance engagement. AR-15 and Sig Sauer MCX explained ( Source ) Is the M13 a Sig MCX? The M13 is a rifle featured in the famous FPS video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare(2019). The M13 has been modelled after the Sig Sauer MCX rifle. It is very popular among COD players as a close to medium range weapon, due to its high rate of fire and low recoil. In real life, the M13 refers to the metallic disintegrating link designed for 7.62x51 belt fed firearms of the U.S Military. Is the Sig Sauer MCX an Assault Rifle? Yes, it is an assault rifle. According to the definition, an assault rifle is a rifle that fires an intermediate cartridge, can switch between firing modes (full auto, semi-auto and/or three round bursts) and uses a detachable magazine. Assault rifles are currently the standard rifle of all modern armies in the world. How Much Does a Sig MCX Cost? These rifles can cost anywhere between US $1,800 to US $2,500. It depends upon the variant of the series. For example, a Sig MCX Virtus 5.56 with a 16 inch barrel costs $1,899 and a Sig MCX pistol with an 11 inch barrel costs $2,000. Whereas a Sig MCX Rattler 300 blk costs $2,299.

Military Medical Systems That Could Save Your Life

Military Medical Systems That Could Save Your Life

Advertisment Like a lot of you guys and gals, I’m always interested in what the military is doing, particularly in regards to how I can shamelessly steal their ideas to keep my ass alive.  To that end, I’m always curious about what our combat medics and corpsmen are carrying in their aid bags , and what the latest training looks like… I’ve always been of the opinion that you should be just as prepared for the horrible moment when you get shot as for the horrible moment when you have to shoot someone else. So many of us carry a gun, but how many of us carry a tourniquet which we’re statistically much more likely to need ? Well, I wanted to know what most of these brave folks were carrying around, and I figured some of you would be interested too. So I asked some of them. I grew up in a military town, I have friends and family in the military, and some of them, including my brother-in-law, are either corpsmen or medics, so I asked around to see what everyone was carrying in their aid bags, and what the new treatment guidelines looked like, and how we civilians could use all that information to keep ourselves safe. Here’s what I found out. Contents Background TCCC and the MARCH Treatment Doctrine (AKA: Dealing With What’s Most Likely to Kill You) Applying TCCC Knowledge to Establish a Civilian Standard of Prehospital Care What is MARCH? Major Hemorrhage Airway Obstruction Parting Shots Background The people I interviewed were my good buddy Jason Baxley who is an Army Combat Medic(68W), and his friend Isaac, who is a Special Forces Medical Sergeant(18D). Finally, I talked to my very own brother-in-law Thomas, who is a Navy Hospital Corpsman (HM4). For my own knowledge, I have first aid, CPR, and TECC (the civilian version of the military’s Tactical Combat Casualty Care) certifications, and a general interest in emergency medicine. I’m always looking to improve those skills, as well as my material preparedness for a medical emergency, so this was a fun project for me. The goal here is to give the average citizen an idea of what basic skills to have, and what to keep in their trauma kit/emergency stash/bugout bag in order to deal with injuries that might occur during a shooting, car accident, natural disaster, or civil unrest such as sustained rioting. I am going to make a disclaimer here before we begin. A few things. First, I’m not a doctor. No one at GB is a doctor. And we’re sure as shit not your doctor, so everything contained here is for general information and entertainment, and is not medical advice. Second, an entire top-of-the-line trauma center’s worth of gear isn’t going to do you the first bit of good if you don’t know how to use it. Find a reputable place to take TECC/TCCC courses, EMT-B courses, or just general first aid courses so that you can actually use all of the information and items we’re going to go over. TCCC and the MARCH Treatment Doctrine (AKA: Dealing With "What’s Most Likely" to Kill You) The military’s collective approach to battlefield medicine is about stabilizing immediately life-threatening injuries so that casualties can be evacuated to a more advanced hospital location. If you want to learn more about TCCC, and how treating life-threatening injuries in combat works, check out this TCCC Quick Reference Guide. Battlefield medics also carry general first-aid supplies for non-life-threatening injuries, and other general maladies like allergies, seasickness, the runs, etc. Finally, Med Sergeants and SF medics in general often carry supplies that they might need to treat locals or perform more advanced care in remote locations where evac could be days away. We’re going to look at what supplies are most applicable to civilian care, and what training the average person can most benefit from getting. This should help guide your own study of civilian first aid and trauma medicine, as well as your ability to build out an effective trauma kit. Applying TCCC Knowledge to Establish a Civilian Standard of Prehospital Care For our purposes, we’re going to be looking primarily at what skills and equipment you’ll most likely need to stabilize the most common life-threatening injuries so that the injured person can be evacuated to a more advanced hospital setting and receive more complete care. This is the situation most of us will find ourselves in if we ever have to deal with life-threatening trauma. In most cases, we’re not going to be that far from a hospital in our day-to-day. We’re focused on what we call the “prehospital” stage of care. Basically, we’re focused on what you can do to stabilize a patient (or yourself) until EMS/first responders with a higher level of training arrive and can get the injured person to a hospital. There’s nothing in this article about running an improvised IV in a burned-out Walmart after the zombie apocalypse. Sorry guys. This is focused on realistic scenarios, and on what you can realistically treat . This isn’t a crash course in meatball surgery. This is about what the average person can train to deal with on the side of a highway, or in a parking lot, or what have you. Even if you’re going into the backcountry to hunt for a week, or you’re trekking across Southeast Asia on vacation, your needs are going to be a little bit different, and beyond the scope of this article (I’d be happy to do an article about building a backcountry/extended trip medical bag though, so give me a shout if that’s something you guys would want to see). For now, we’re going to cover what the military teaches under the MARCH system of TCCC. This is basically a checklist of the things that will kill you, or a patient in your care, and the order in which they will kill you. Think of it as a priority list when addressing injuries. So the big goal for today is not to teach you everything you need to know to be a 68Whiskey (Army Medic) its to show you the skills and equipment you need to be able to stop preventable death due to physical trauma. What is MARCH? When you see MARCH in this context, we’re talking about M ajor Hemorrhage, A irway, R espiration, C irculation, H ypothermia and H ead Trauma. The H-ABC’s are another way I’ve seen this list, especially on the civilian side. It’s very similar and stands for H emorrhage, A irway, B reathing, and C irculation. Everything we’re going to go over today is going to focus on dealing with these issues, but we’re going to focus on the MARCH acronym, and the gear needed to treat things in that order, and what a civilian is likely going to be called upon to do. The respiration, circulation, hypothermia and head trauma issues are more for someone at the hospital stage in a civilian setting, so we’re going to leave those for the paramedics and the doctors and nurses at the hospital, okay? Oh, and one more thing, we’re going to add a step. Direct someone nearby to call 911. Look at them, point, loudly say their name if you know it or identify them somehow (“You, blue shirt guy”) and tell them to call 911 and request EMS. Do this as you’re starting to render aid. You’d be shocked how often people just freeze up in a situation like that and forget that trained professionals in a mini mobile hospital are probably less than fifteen minutes away…as long as they’re called quickly. Major Hemorrhage In a trauma context, major uncontrolled hemorrhaging is what’s going to kill you or your patient first. The more blood that’s on the floor, the less likely survival becomes, so the first thing that military medics look to is controlling hemorrhaging, and that’s where you should start as well. Remember, we’re dealing with stuff that we can treat. Brain injury, a gunshot to the heart, evisceration with guts hanging out are outside our ability to treat on the scene. Bleeding from an extremity or the torso? That we can handle. Under the TCCC system, this is the biggest part of the “Care Under Fire” stage, aside from making sure that the casualty and the person giving aid don’t take any further injuries. Remember, we’re controlling bleeding when it is tactically advisable and safe to do so . And the way you control hemorrhaging is what, class? That’s right, you apply pressure! But how and where and with what? The primary method, and the thing you should absorb into your brain even if you skip everything else here; is to use a tourniquet. Tourniquets alone stop about 70% of preventable deaths on the modern battlefield under TCCC. That’s insane to me, and it should be enough to make you want to keep one (or several) handy. Anyone deployed in a combat situation is going to have an IFAK with at least one tourniquet in it. Maybe two. There a number of tourniquets that have been approved by the military under TCCC, but the ones that you’ll find in just about every Infantry First-Aid Kit(IFAK) or aid bag are the SOF-T Wide and the CAT tourniquets . Opinions differ, but I think in general the CAT is more popular and easier for someone who hasn’t practiced with them a thousand times to use. The CAT is also, in my opinion, easier to apply to yourself, and the SOF-Ts are easier to apply to someone else. Maybe grab one of each, and keep the CAT handy for yourself, and the SOF-T in your car or household emergency kit. Next on the “don’t bleed to death” list is applying a chest seal to any wounds on the torso. Chest seals are dressings specifically designed to stick to the torso to prevent air from being sucked into the chest cavity and causing a tension pneumothorax, or more classically a “collapsed lung”. This is more of an airway step if we’re strictly following the MARCH order, but tension pneumothorax can be treated by carefully using a 14 gauge catheter/decompression needle to release pressure in the chest cavity if you’ve been trained to use one. I carry one in my first aid kit , but I know how to use one. If you screw this up, it’s possible to do more harm than good. It’s much easier to simply carry chest seals, and a lot harder to kill someone with one, but try to take a weekend TECC/TCCC class and learn how to treat a tension pneumothorax. As far as general chest wounds, don’t worry about identifying a sucking chest wound vs a non-sucking chest wound. Take a chest seal, wipe off the area so there’s the minimum amount of dirt and blood on it, and slap the chest seal on the wound, sticky side down. Then get your casualty to a hospital. The chest seals I personally carry are Hyfin seals , but any seal that uses hydrogel adhesive is pretty much good to go. You can also improvise a chest seal in a pinch with some plastic wrap and tape, but we’re trying to be prepared, not prepared to improvise. After chest seals, we have pressure dressings. In a pinch, a pressure dressing can be a clean rag and some duct tape, but we’re trying to move beyond improvisation and actually be prepared for this stuff, right? Well, the most common pressure dressings are simply Kerlix and an ACE bandage . Every experienced EMT, corpsmen, medic, and Special Forces High-Speed Cool Guy I’ve talked to has advised to simply do away with the fancy Israeli bandage, and instead just carry two rolls of gauze, two elastic bandage wraps, and a small pocket-sized roll of duct tape . It turns out not even the Special Forces can improve on duct tape. The reason for the gauze and the ACE wrap over the Israeli bandage or other “tactical dressing” is two-fold. First, the gauze pad on those fancy Cool Guy bandages can’t be used to pack a wound. Second, they’re literally just a gauze pad and an ACE wrap. Also, you can find elastic bandages and gauze all over the world, so it doesn’t really matter where you are, you can find something that will work for a pressure dressing without paying $30 for the tacticool one in the fancy camouflage wrapper. There are other things you can add to your emergency kit to deal with major hemorrhaging, particularly a hemostatic dressing. The two recommendations I got were for Combat Gauze and Celox . Airway Obstruction After bleeding, we have airway issues to worry about, specifically preventing airway obstruction when a casualty becomes unconscious and the risk of the tongue blocking the airway becomes a worry. There are a few ways to handle this. Number one is positioning the casualty so that if they do lose consciousness, their airway won’t be obstructed. Second, we have the nasopharyngeal airway, also called an NPA, or nose trumpet if you’re old school. An NPA is simply a tube that you run through a patient’s nose and down their throat to secure the airway and ensure they can continue breathing. NPA’s are relatively safe, even with potential head trauma, but they still require training to use properly so as I’ve said before, take a class before you use them. If you’re lucky, the nice SF medic teaching the class will choose you as a “volunteer” and you’ll get to feel an NPA going up your very own nose. It’s super fun. The most commonly recommended NPA is the #28 , and this is the one that’s going to be in most aid bags and IFAKs used by NATO forces. Parting Shots There’s a lot more to TCCC and emergency first aid in general, but this should be enough to get you thinking about how much you don’t know, and what you need to learn. There’s a lot of info out there on this stuff available via the internet but please, please, please take a class. It could save your life, or the lives of your loved ones. Beyond that, I hope you enjoyed this, and I hope you learned a lot about how military medical personnel treats casualties, and how that knowledge can be applied to your own preparedness.

Ranking The 10 Best Bear Sprays of 2020

Ranking The 10 Best Bear Sprays of 2020

Hunters and outdoor enthusiasts are no strangers to unexpected encounters with wildlife. While most of these encounters are simply a passing glance in one another’s direction, there’s always the possibility of startling an animal that wasn’t expecting you to be there. When startled, bears are some of the most powerful and dangerous creatures you’ll find in the wild, so having a solution to protect yourself is essential. Our list of the 10 Best Bear Sprays will help you defend yourself by temporarily incapacitating and (mostly) scaring away our large furry friends. 1. Frontiersman 7.9-ounce Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This 7.9-ounce bottle of bear spray comes with the maximum strength formula allowed by the EPA and Health Canada. It has a 2.0% MC rating and this strength has been thoroughly tested by the University of Utah ( 1 ) to eliminate the 30% failure rate experienced with some other brands. This bear spray is most effective against black, brown, and polar bears. The Frontiersman 7.9-ounce Bear Spray is an essential addition to any hiker’s toolkit. It features a 30-foot range with a large barrier of up to 45 grams per second. It delivers a heavy fog of spray that has been tested effective in the field by members of the Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska and Brown Bear Resources in Missoula, Montana. 2. Counter Assault Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This bear spray features the hottest formula allowed by the EPA with 2% capsaicin. It’s ideal for new users because it offers a long spray time of 7.2 seconds, giving you plenty of opportunities to create the fog barrier of spray that will deter an oncoming bear. The Counter Assault Bear Deterrent is an 8.1-ounce bottle that’s capable of spraying fog at a distance of up to 30 feet. It’s also packaged in a tamper-resistant, sealed blister pack for safety and includes a glow-in-the-dark safety tie that makes it easier to handle in the dark. 3. UDAP Pepper Power Safety Orange Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This bear spray offers a super hot formula that’s one of the hottest on the market. If you’re heading out for a hike or backpacking trip in bear country, it’s a no-brainer to carry this along with you, especially because of the included Griz Guard holster that enables shoot-from-the-hip deployment with this bear spray. The UDAP Pepper "Power Safety Orange" Bear Spray shoots at a range of up to 30 feet to affect the bear’s eyes, nose, and lungs. The bottle is 7.9-ounces in weight and its highly visible safety orange color means bears can see you and might recognize that you’re not to be messed with before you have to deploy the spray. 4. Bear Guard Alaska Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This 9-ounce can of pepper spray is one of the only sprays registered with the EPA to be effective against all species of bear. It’s also environmentally safe, doesn’t contain any flammable or ozone-depleting substances, and is endorsed by the Alaska Science and Technology Foundation. The "Bear Guard Alaska" super size bear spray is capable of spraying to ranges of up to 15 to 20 feet and comes with dimensions of 8-3/4” x 2”. The accompanying holster is made of nylon with a Velcro closure and a belt loop attachment. 5. Mace Brand Bear Attack Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This Mace "Brand Bear Attack" Bear Spray contains a 2.0% Capsaicinoid concentration. Mace products are manufactured in the United States and shipped from Cleveland, Ohio, so you’re getting a quality, American-made product if you go with the Mace brand name. This bear spray contains a powerful magnum fogger that can deliver a blast cloud of spray up to 35 feet away. The canister is larger than 9 ounces, but it empties in just six seconds to create an intense barrier to an attacking bear. This spray also comes with a matching holster to keep it handy, but also to keep your hands-free until you need it! 6. UDAP 18HP Click here for the lowest price on Amazon Another iteration from UDAP, this bear spray is a must-have for grizzly country. The 18HP version comes with a huge, 13.4-ounce (380 gram) bottle of 2% CRC solution. It’s the largest bear deterrent registered by the EPA. The UDAP 18HP Bear Spray features a maximum spray distance of 35 feet and disperses the totality of its contents in just seven seconds. Unlike some brands, this spray deploys a concentrated, dense fog that covers a broader area in a shorter period of time, which means more protection for you. 7. Ruger RB0100 Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This bear spray from Ruger is ideal for use on multiple bears in one shot. It unleashes a full 9.2 seconds of continuous spray and reaches ranges up to 20 feet. The canister’s solution is dispersed in a fog cloud pattern to maximize effectiveness. The Ruger RB0100 Bear Spray canister contains a total of 9 ounces of high concentration solution. It is also a great bear spray for wetter environments, such as the Pacific Northwest, as it is capable of penetrating wet fur to still have the desired effect. 8. UDAP 12HP Click here for the lowest price on Amazon Developed by a bear attack survivor, this 12HP Bear Spray from UDAP is great for the novice user because it also comes with a free, 32-page booklet containing a number of great bear safety tips. The spray itself is the hottest available by EPA standards, with a 2% CRC solution. This bear spray is ideal for hunters and outdoor enthusiasts that require high-performance products they can rely on. It has a maximum blast range of 20 feet to create an effective barrier against a charging bear. It also comes with a glow-in-the-dark safety clip with a chain attached to aid in nighttime use. 9. Dragon Fire Repellent Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This two-pack of bear spray offers a powerful 19% OC solution in a compact, easy-to-canister. This makes it an ideal spray for anyone that doesn’t want to carry a bulky canister around every time they trod into bear country. The Dragon Fire Bear Repellent offers a maximum spray range of up to 10 feet and packs up to 12 sprays. It is also a product manufactured in the USA and comes with a keychain attachment that makes it easily accessible at a moment’s notice. 10. Frontiersman Maximum Strength Click here for the lowest price on Amazon The larger version of Frontiersman’s Maximum Strength bear canister features a 9.2-ounce canister capable of delivering a fog barrier at the industry max range of 35 feet. Ideal for grizzly country, this bear spray also offers industry-leading stopping power with a max strength, 2.0% major Capsaicinoid solution. This bear spray delivers 52 grams of solution per second to create the industry’s largest barrier against bear attacks. It also sprays up to 40% more solution per burst than its competitors. Lastly, this bear spray can remain immediately accessible via a chest holster and its glow-in-the-dark safety makes it easy to locate in low light conditions. — Buyer’s Guide Bear spray first started to gain popularity in the late 1980s as a “revolutionary tool for better co-existence.” ( 2 ) Since then, the types and strengths of bear sprays available have proliferated greatly, leaving you, the buyer, with many options. This Buyer’s Guide will focus on a few major characteristics that separate good sprays from great ones: strength and range, spray duration and capacity, and extras. Strength and Range Generally, bear sprays are more powerful and effective than pepper sprays. Bears, of course, are stronger targets to deter than most (if not all) humans. However, the common active ingredient in both bear and pepper spray is oleoresin capsicum ( 3 ). While pepper sprays used for self-defense typically have an MC rating between 0.18% and 1.33%, most bear sprays rate between 1% and 2%. The best sprays on the market offer a 2% MC rating, which is the hottest available under EPA standards, mostly for safety reasons. Range is also an important consideration because, unlike a human assailant, a charging bear can be moving at you at rates up to 35 miles per hour. Bear spray range can vary from about 12 to 35 feet, but most fall somewhere in the 15 to 20 feet range. Most experts, however, recommend buying a bear spray that offers a minimum range of at least 16 feet. Spray Duration and Capacity Every bear spray also features a different duration of spray. Some last from 4 to 6 seconds while others last as long as 7 to 9 seconds. Generally, a longer spray will give you more opportunity to deter a charging animal, but it’s more important to make sure your can is EPA-approved so that you can trust that all its features have been thoroughly tested to work efficiently and effectively. Canister capacities will vary from brand to brand as well. Generally, it is recommended to find a spray that contains at least 7 ounces of solution, but many experts suggest finding one with closer to 9 ounces of content. For reference, the largest bear sprays on the market still weigh less than a pound; so don’t be expecting a massive canister the size of a small fire extinguisher. Extras Many bear spray brands have started to add a host of features to make canisters easier to carry and use in a variety of situations. Chest and belt holsters are one good example. Glow-in-the-dark safety features are another. Having your bear spray easily accessible can be key if you find yourself in a confrontation with an angry mama bear. At this point, you’re not really going to want to fumble around in your backpack to find your best mechanism for self-defense. Additionally, features that make your canister easier to locate and use in the dark are essential for backpackers and campers in bear country. Unfortunately, it is most often at night when we forget to properly secure food scraps that bears come in close contact with humans. Lastly, many brands have also started including safety caps. For all users, these caps are critical in preventing accidental discharge and reducing the likelihood that the wrong critter (or person) gets sprayed. Frequently Asked Questions Having bear spray on hand when the moment arrives will make a huge difference, but just buying a bear spray is only the first step. Knowing how to properly use your bear spray and maintain it are also important. This "Frequently Asked Questions" section will discuss the use, maintenance, and a few other key topics you’ll need to know when buying or using bear spray. How does bear spray really work? In short, an aerosol can shoot bursts of atomized capsaicin, which is a derivative of cayenne pepper. This solution is most effective at short range, but some canisters can shoot up to 35 feet. The solution causes the membranes of the eyes, nose, and lungs to swell and the result is a temporary, but nearly complete, loss of sight and a severe restriction of breathing. When should my bear spray be replaced? Bear spray should be replaced when it has been discharged for any reason, left in extreme temperatures (above 50 degrees Celsius or below freezing), or has passed its expiration date. The reason is that the seal that holds the propellant can deteriorate and become compromised, which reduces the ability of the product to propel the spray effectively. What is the safest way to transport bear spray? Always be careful to keep the spray’s safety mechanism securely in place. Never transport your spray inside the passenger area of a vehicle or airplane unless you have it securely enclosed in a fully-sealed container. How long do the effects of bear spray last? The exact answer will depend on the specific solution in the bear spray being deployed. Generally, however, the average full effect of most market bear sprays will last somewhere between 20 and 90 minutes ( 4 ). Summary Many studies have shown that bear spray is even more effective than a speeding bullet when it comes to defending yourself against the full charge of a grizzly at 35 miles per hour. We hope that you’ve found this information useful and we wish you the best of luck in finding the best bear spray for you.

The 4 Best Marlin Model 60 Mods – Accessory Reviews 2020 Photo by Madison Scott-Clary / CC BY The Marlin Model 60 is a classic firearm that has been a favorite of shooters and plinkers for decades. The classic design is simple, reliable, and accurate. But the Model 60 is also quite plain and could easily be upgraded. When upgrading any gun you should always invest in quality parts; anything less will make your weapon less reliable. Upgrades should also modify the weapon is a positive manner that makes it easier to use, more accurate, and in the case of a plinker like the Model 60, it should make the weapon more fun to fire. Here are, in our humble opinion, the 4 best Marlin Model 60 mods on the market. AVAWO Hunting Bipod AVAWO Hunting Rifle Bipod - 6 Inch to 9 Inch Adjustable Super Duty Tactical Rifle Bipod Price: $16.99 Price as of 08/14/2020 12:26 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. The AVAWO hunting bipod offers Marlin Model 60 shooters a lightweight durable platform that allows shooters to increase their accuracy and comfort while firing. The Model 60 is an excellent small game rifle and over the decades it’s been in production it must’ve taken untold numbers of rabbits, squirrels, and other small critters. The AVAWO bipod allows the shooter to maintain a consistent and stable hold while getting on target and offers a supported shooting position. The bipod is a folding and extending bipod that aids in capitalizing on both size and effectiveness. The bipod is capable of extending its legs from 6 to 9 inches in length, and each leg is independent. This independence allows the shooter to compensate for uneven ground. The bipod itself is made from hardened steel aluminum and is durable and rugged. At the same time the bipod weighs only 10 ounces, which is important since you aren’t looking to add weight to your weapon. The AVAWO bipod uses spring loaded legs and is black anodized to prevent rust from building up. The feet are circular and made from hard plastic and ribbed for great grip. The bipod moves forwards and backwards in a pivotal motion that ranges roughly 20 degrees. The bipod can easily attach to the Marlin Model 60 since it attaches to the bipod sling swivel. This should be on anyone’s list of the best Marlin Model 60 mods. Tech Sights Tech-SIGHT'S TSM200 Adjustable Aperture Sight for THE MARLIN 60, 795, 70P & 70PSS Rifles Price: $69.00 Price as of 08/14/2020 06:50 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. The Tech Sights is a dovetail set of replacement sights design specifically for the Marlin Model 60. The Model 60 does come with a completely suitable set of sights that function well for basic shooting. However, they are far from precise and are designed for shooting during optimal shooting conditions. These open sights are quite outdated when it comes to iron sight technology, and it’s completely understandable that one would want to change these old school iron sights out. "The Tech Sights" are completely modern and replicate the same kind of iron sights you would find on a modern AR 15 or even a military issue M16. These sights are known as peep, or aperture sights. These specific Tech Sights are modeled after the standard M16 sights. So they are easy to use, reliable, and highly adjustable. The rear peep sight has both windage and elevation attached to it. Adjustments are easy to make, and can be done without a tool. The front sight is a standard AR front sight with a dedicated set of wings that act protect the front post. This keeps the sight from being struck and being knocked out of zero. The rear sight mounts further back that standard Marlin iron sights, and this gives you six extra inches of sight radius, which makes precision shooting much easier. The tech Sights are an excellent way to modernize your rifle and easily some of the best Marlin Model 60 accessories. Vortex Crossfire 2 Rimfire Vortex Optics Crossfire II 2-7x32 Rimfire, Second Focal Plane, 1-inch Tube Riflescope - V-Plex Reticle Price: $129.00 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:10 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. The Vortex company has been producing high-quality, decently priced firearms for some time now. These optics range from tactical red dots to extremely high quality tactical rifle scopes. The Vortex brand has branched outwards to include the rimfire realm. This has opened up a new line of optics that will work hand in hand with your Marlin Model 60. The Crossfire series, for example, is quite popular with AR owners and hunters, and now they have a rimfire variant for your Model 60. The Vortex Crossfire 2 is a 2 to 7 power scope ( see full specs ) that is lightweight, compact and well made. The Crossfire 2 features a 32 mm objective lens, which keeps the scope small and light, while providing enough power and light transmission to make accurate and precise shots possible. "The Vortex Crossfire" 2 has a fully multi coated lenses which increase light transmission, and reduces glare to almost nothing. The scope uses a standard 1 inch tube that is a single piece design. A lot of these features are hard to find on a rimfire optic, but Vortex has jumped into the ring with this awesome design. The Vortex Crossfire 2 is made from aircraft grade aluminum and is extremely overbuilt for the .22 long rifle round. This scope could easily handle more powerful calibers, but is best suited for rimfire rounds. The simple V plex reticle makes accurate shots easy and precise, and this is easily one of the best rimfire scopes and best Marlin Model 60 mods for the money. Marlin 795 with Vortex scope Watch this video on YouTube

Top 10 New Guns of [2019] from SHOT Show

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s SHOT Show is over! After days of walking the floor, and over 35 miles walked the Show is now long past. After handling, shooting, and asking dozens of questions about different guns I’ve poured over my photos, videos, and notebooks trying to figure out what weapons I saw were my favorites. It’s a tough call . I saw a lot of cool guns and to make this list I’ve decided to include new weapons for 2019. I also only chose guns I would own, albeit the price tag of some will make that prohibitive. Other than that there is no rhyme, reason, or theme to my list… Top 10 New Guns of 2019 1. Walther PPQ Steel Frame The Walther PPQ isn’t a new gun, and neither is the Q5, but this particular model is entirely different than those two. It has a steel frame. This adds weight to the weapon, but it also adds control. More weight means less felt recoil. The Q5 Steel Frame design and the Q5, in general, is designed for competition use. This means the extra weight isn’t an issue and is a helpful addition to the gun. Walther PPQ Q5 Steel Frame Admittedly I am not a competition shooter. Closest I do to comp shooting is sucking hard at trap and skeet. I certainly would love to hear a comp shooter’s opinion on this gun. My opinion is that this is a classy handgun. At range day I fell in love with it. The gun was buttery smooth and so effortless to control when firing rapidly. The ergonomics and feel of the gun in hand were brilliant, and the grip design is fantastic. It fills the hand, is easy to point and the trigger is outstanding. The weapon itself is optics ready, and the optics mounting platform is modular, and it can attach a multitude of different optics. The Walther Q5 Steel frame is a bit pricey for a defensive firearm, but it could indeed serve in that role. The gun has a Picatinny rail for lights or lasers, and the stock iron sights are high visibility. The magazines have a 17 round capacity, and that’s plenty for most defensive encounters. The Walther Steel frame was probably my favorite gun to handle and fire. I’m also a super big fan of the PPQ so maybe I’m biased, but the Steel Frame is a brilliant idea, and I might have to come off 1,400 bones to buy one. 2. Kel Tec CP33 It takes a lot to get me excited about a .22 LR handgun. I already have an old SW 22A, and that’s all I need right? Well, until the CP33 that is what I thought. The CP33 is like a slightly smaller than the PMR 30. Kel Tec CP33 and a clear quad stack magazine, cool! The PMR 30 was a .22 Magnum gun that held 30 rounds of .22 magnum in a  flush fitting magazine. The CP33 is a similar idea that fits 33 rounds of .22 LR into a quad stack magazine that is also false flush fitting. Kel-Tec told me they are working on an extended 50 round magazine as well. The CP33 looks cool and handles like a dream. How do you reduce the recoil of a .22? Put it in a large platform. At Range Day I got to handle a suppressed version and loved it. Recoil was non-existent, and the suppressor makes it a puppy. It was surprisingly accurate and very reliable through the first few mags I put through it. This looks like a gun from the future and functions much differently than your standard handgun. Lacking a reciprocating slide it instead uses a charging handle very similar to the AR 15. It’s a grip and rip style charging handle. The top of the gun sports an extra long rail to allow you to mount optics and M-Lok slots allow direct attachment of rails and accessories. Best of all the CP33 has an MSRP of only $475, not bad for a cool and interesting new pistol. 3. Brownells AR-180 Upper There is a section of the internet that always screams for Armalite to bring back the AR 18, ignoring that they tried to, once and it failed. Now is the time for those people to put their money where their mouths are. BRN 180 Brownells has teamed up with PWS and FM Products to make an AR 18 upper for your standard AR 15 lower. The upper is completely modernized and features an M-LOK rail system and a flat top upper for easy attachment of optics. Best of all the upper’s gas piston designs means no buffer needed. You can toss it on a standard lower and fill the receiver extension hole with an MCX stock adapter from KNS and attach folding or PDW style MCX stocks. Additionally, you can attach almost any AR stock and side folding adapters and fire with the stock folded. You’ll have a single side charging handle and the gun will handle both 223 and 5.56. A lot of people don’t realize just how influential this gun was. Guns like the Bren and SCAR series all utilize a design very similar to the AR-18. Brownells BRN-180 800 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 800 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing This upper gives the average joe the ability to experience an AR 18 at a budget price. The complete upper will cost 799 and is available for pre-order now. What’s your take on the BRN-18? Readers' Ratings 4.93/5 (181) Your Rating? 4. ATI Galil I am a big fan of the Cold War era rifles. I love old school M16s, AKs, FN FALs, G3s, and of course the Galil. That being said I can get easily get an AR, AK clone, a FAL from DSA, G3 from PTR but where can I get an old school Galil? We didn’t get a picture of the new ATI Galils, but they look almost identical to these. Picture source There are new Galil clones from IMI, but I like old school. American Tactical Imports is now producing Galil clones for an MSRP of $1299 and that’s a little rough but street price will be lower. These guns are built with American made barrels and receivers, and everything else is Israeli parts kits. The Galil is such a cool gun, and I love sending lead down range at range day with it. This was a pleasant surprise, and I fell in love with it. Part of that loves comes from the coolness of Cold War weapons, the other part was getting behind the gun. From the standing, with a gun I never fired, I was hitting steel targets at 100 yards with ease. Every freaking round hit it, and I loved it. The trigger was excellent, the recoil was minimal, and the gun handled well for its aged design. The guns will have a folding stock, and come with either a wood handguard or a polymer one. The guns should be coming out mid next year, but SHOT Show prediction dates are typically adjustable and move around a lot. 5. Century AES-10B I’m pretty biased when it comes to guns. I usually like guns that are big and loud. I was a Marine, and I was a machine gunner for many years so big and loud is my forte. With the NFA and Hughes Amendment being what they are I’ll never get to handles a real machine gun until I hit the lottery or get a rock solid Patreon following. Century AES 10B However, as a machine gun enthusiast, as well as an admirer of Soviet Small arms I am excited to see that Century will be providing us with RPKs in semi-automatic configurations. The AES-10B is the least imaginative name for an RPK clone, but it is what it is. The Century AES-10B has come and gone from the import scene, and this is a direct follow-up from the new PSLs being imported into the country. The RPK is essentially an AK that’s beefier and is more of an automatic rifle or Squad Automatic Weapon than a proper machinegun. However, I loved it and was pumped to see they will be making a comeback this year. It will come with a bipod, heavy barrel, carry handle and a hefty MSRP of $1499. That’s a significant number for a non-arsenal AK with a long barrel and bipod. I’m still pretty freakin’ excited to see these come back to the market and I hope the price can drop a bit before they do. 6. Lancer L30 AIR This choice is the sneakiest and one I didn’t see coming. I love Lancer, from their handguards to their magazines. They make high quality, and great gear and the L30 AIR looks, for lack of a better term, cool as hell. It takes a lot to get me interested in an AR platform, and Lancer did it quite well. The L30 AIR has a 14.1-inch barrel and features the Nitrous compensator that is pinned and welded to meet the 16-inch requirement to avoid being an NFA weapon. The L30 AIR is chambered in 308 Winchester and 6.5 Creedmoor. AIR stands for Aerial Interdiction Rifle, and the idea is that this rifle will be used for shooters in a helicopter. The overall design has weight reduction with lighter receivers, BCGs, and a skeletonized rail. It’s super light for an AR-10 platform and remarkably easy to handle. The gun’s caliber choices mean a heavier round, more penetration and less deviation due to the wind. The MSRP is a stunning four grand, so this won’t be joining the collection, but I can lust over it. 7. CZ P-10 Full Size , Sub Compact , and Optics Ready The CZ P-10C wasn’t CZ’s first striker-fired handgun, but it was their most successful. The C denominator meant compact, and that lead most people to assume we’d see a full sized and subcompact model. They weren’t wrong, CZ Showed us both at SHOT 2019. CZ P-10 S (Subcompact) What we didn’t predict is the fact that the F, the C, and the S models would all have optics ready options. Optics ready guns are all the rage these days, and CZ is never shy to adjust and upgrade their designs. The fact they are introducing both the F and S models with an optic’s ready option is awe-inspiring to me. The 10C was a great gun, and now we have two different size options, and I’m excited about a 19 round CZ P10F with a mounted optic. Better yet the optic’s cut will add less than 100 dollars to the MSRP of these guns, and the MSRP is currently $577. CZ P-10 F (Full-sized) It can be hard to get excited about just another striker fired 9mm, but the P-10 series is overall an excellent gun. The trigger is masterful, reliability is brilliant, and Tim at the Military Arms Channel proved the gun was reliable over a high round count. With the great price and design, I will certainly be adding a CZ P10F to my collection to compliment my P09. 8. Glock 48 I knew about the Glock 48 before I went to SHOT and didn’t see what the big deal was about the Glock 48. I honestly thought it was a bit lame. It’s a skinny 19, what’s the point. However, this came from a space of only considering my point of view. Glock 48, 9mm I’m a big dude and concealing a Glock 19 isn’t an issue for me. However, I’m not all people. The Glock 19 is often considered the gold standard for design when it comes to having a mix of an easy to conceal pistol and a competent fighting weapon. The grip is just long enough to fill your hand, and the gun offers a substantial sight radius as well as a low overall weight. The Glock 48 capitalizes on all of that. It’s lighter, thinner, but still fills the hand and has the same sight radius. Also, the gun is perfect for states that have magazine capacity restrictions. The Glock 19 with a 10 round magazine isn’t as efficient as the Glock 48. The design also features a slightly longer barrel than the Glock 19, which happens to satisfy a minimal millimeter length for the barrel to make it Canadian legal. Glock 48 480 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 480 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing I loved shooting the gun at Range day and found it to be quite satisfying and easy to handle. I like the nPVD coating for the stainless steel appearance, and as a Glock, you know the aftermarket will be massive and so will the holster market. We also have a complete hands-on review on the Glock 48 and G43X , he was lucky enough to get pre-release versions to play with! Glock G43X and G48 9. Colt King Cobra I do enjoy revolvers. There is something to be said for the old school cool of a six-gun, and the "Colt King Cobra" is an actual six gun. The Colt King Cobra is Colt’s second entry into their new modern snake gun line and is the evolution of the Cobra. King Cobra in .357 Magnum The King Cobra is a .357 magnum compact revolver chambered in .357 Magnum. The Colt King Cobra is a compact revolver, but it’s not a snub nose revolver. .357 snub nose revolvers are rough to handle and often lose some velocity from a 1.8-inch barrel. "The King Cobra" has a 3-inch barrel but keeps the Cobra’s compact frame. It’s a little bigger, a little heavier, but it’s substantially more powerful.  The King Cobra is a sweet small revolver, and it’s the Glock 19 of the revolver world. It’s just right when it comes to power, balance, barrel length, and concealability. The Colt King Cobra as an MSRP of $899 and the best news is they are already shipping. The bad news is the prices currently on Gunbroker are crazy high, hundreds over MSRP at the moment. This is a gun that’s worth waiting out, and when the market stabilizes a bit we’ll see prices drop, and I might add some class to my concealed carry collection. 10. Bren 2 Ms In more CZ news we got to see the new Bren pistol. I use the term pistol lightly because this is a rifle that doesn’t have a stock so by legal definition it is a pistol. It has a short barrel so adding a stock makes it an SBR. Bren 2 Ms, 7.62×39 I guess its a rifle caliber pistol. The original Bren was built for a military contract and done to a specific standard. The Bren 2 Ms was designed from the ground up and is a serious improvement over the original Bren. This includes a non-reciprocating charging handle, an additional chambering of 7.62×39, and multiple barrel lengths. You’ll be easily able to swap barrel lengths, and barrel lengths will be 8, 9, 11, or 14 inches. The Bren 2 Ms has a carbon fiber reinforced lower and weighs a full 1.5 pounds less than the original Bren. It comes ready to attach an AR buffer tube for SBRing purposes, or to attach a brace to make this big pistol a little easier to handle. The Bren 2 Ms will run on AR magazines for 5.56 variants, and the gun will have a proprietary magazine for 7.62×39. Hopefully, this proprietary magazines will be affordable and easy to find. Like the CZ Scorpion mags. Time will tell, and while I was initially interested in the Bren, I think I’ll keep holding out for the Bren 2 Ms. SHOTs Out SHOT Show is always a fun event and one that brings out the best in our industry. The Show brings surprises, disappointments and often it gives us things to look forward too. With that in mind now that the show is over, what were some of your favorites of SHOT Show?  Be sure to check out our Editor’s Picks for our top guns and gear (of all years).

Summary

Intro I want to start this off by saying I have shot a lot of 1911s but have never been in love with them. I can see why many carry and love them, but they have never filled my needs. Now in my experience there are bad and good 1911s.